Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Haleakala Cake


Haleakala Cake Source: Maida Heatter's Cakes (Andrews & McMeel Publishing, 2011 ed.), pg. 119.

I don't think my cake turned out as dramatic as it was described in the book. For one thing, I made a mistake at the grocery store and only bought one can of crushed pineapple instead of two. So, I decided to half the recipe for the filling. The cake turned out fine, it was just not as tall as it would have been with the extra filling. It tasted wonderful and reminded me of an old-fashioned coconut cake.

The icing recipe made an insane amount of icing! I ended up with way too much to use on the cake. I did save it so perhaps I can use it for another project (it cannot be frozen however).


This cake was very easy to make! I thought the pineapple filling was an adequate amount. I believe that I would cut the icing recipe in half the next time. So despite the fact that my cake looked more like a sheetcake instead of a celebration cake, it was a hit.


Pineapple Filling
2 1.4 oz cans crushed pineapple
2 TBS lemon juice
2 TBS plus 1 1/2 tsp cornstarch
2 TBS sugar
1/8 tsp salt
1 tsp vanilla extract

Drain the pineapple, reserving the juice, and set aside. Add the lemon juice to the pineapple juice.

In a large saucepan, stir together the cornstarch, sugar and salt. Gradually add the pineapple juice and mix until smooth. Place the pan over medium heat and stir until the mixture comes to a boil. Reduce the heat and let it simmer for about 1 1/2 minutes.  Remove from the heat and add the vanilla. If you wish, add 6-8 drops of the food coloring. Refrigerate until ready to use (you can make this days ahead).
Yellow food coloring (optional)

Cake

2 cups sifted all-purpose flour
3 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter (1 stick) (softened)
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup milk
4 egg whites



Preheat oven to 350. Line 2 9-inch pans with wax or parchment paper. Spray or butter the pans and the paper. Dust with flour and set the pans aside.

Sift the flour, baking powder and salt together and set aside.

In a large mixer bowl, beat the butter until it is smooth.  Add the vanilla and sugar, mixing well. On low speed, add the flour mixture alternately in three additions along with the milk in two additions.  Beat on high speed for 10-15 seconds. Add the egg whites (unbeaten) on high speed for about 2 minutes.

Spread the mixture evenly between the pans. Bake 20-30 minutes until the tops are lightly browned 
and the top of the cake bounces back when lightly pressed with your fingertip.  Remove from the oven, slide a knife along the edges and allow to cool for about 5 minutes before turning them out onto a cooling rack. Allow to cool completely.

Marshmallow Icing

1 1/2 cups sugar
2/3 tsp cream of tartar
2/3 cup water
4-5 egg whites (2/3 cup)

1 1/4 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 cup shredded coconut (for sprinkling over the top)



Place the sugar, cream of tartar and water in a 6-cup saucepan. Stir with a wooden spoon until the mixture comes to a boil and the sugar is dissolved. Cover the pot with a lid and allow it to boil for 3 minutes. Uncover and insert a candy thermometer. Continue to boil until the temperature reaches 242 degrees.

Add the salt to the egg whites in a clean, large mixer bowl and beat until the whites are stiff. When the sugar syrup is ready, pour it into the egg whites with the mixer on high speed. Continue to beat at high speed for about 5 minutes until the mixture has a marshmallow-like consistency. Mix in the vanilla.



Before assembling the cake, place pieces of paper around the bottom to prevent a mess. Spread half of the pineapple mixture over the first layer. Place the second layer over the first and spread the remaining pineapple mixture on top.



Apply the icing around the sides of the cake as well as the top. Sprinkle the coconut over the top. When finished, carefully remove the pieces of paper. The cake can be served at room temperature. Refrigerate any leftovers.